Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone Book Summary

A Novel

by Diana Gabaldon66

TL;DR

In 'Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone,' Diana Gabaldon continues the epic Outlander series, depicting the Frasers' struggle to protect their family amidst the looming Revolutionary War.

What is Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone about

'Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone' is the ninth installment in Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series. Set in 1779, it follows Jamie and Claire Fraser as they reunite with their daughter Brianna, son-in-law Roger, and their grandchildren on Fraser's Ridge. The family faces mounting tensions from the Revolutionary War, which threaten their safety and unity. The novel captures their efforts to safeguard their home and loved ones amid the chaos, exploring themes of loyalty, identity, and resilience.

Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone 7 Key Takeaways

Reunion at Fraser's Ridge

Jamie and Claire Fraser are reunited with their daughter Brianna, her husband Roger, and their children in 1779 America, seeking refuge and stability amidst growing tensions.

Revolutionary War Encroaches

As the Revolutionary War intensifies, Jamie and Claire prepare Fraser's Ridge for the impending conflict, managing split loyalties among their tenants.

Brianna and Roger's Dilemma

Brianna and Roger grapple with the dangers of 1779, questioning whether their escape from the 20th century was the right choice for their family's safety.

William Ransom's Identity Crisis

Young William Ransom struggles with his identity and future, seeking to understand the family he never knew while facing personal challenges.

Lord John Grey's Reconciliations

Lord John Grey navigates reconciliations and dangers, both for his son William and himself, as the Revolutionary War looms closer.

Young Ian Murray's Battle

Young Ian Murray confronts his past and future, torn between the two women he has loved, while dealing with the broader conflicts around him.

Preparation for War

Jamie sharpens his sword, and Claire readies her surgeon's blade, symbolizing their readiness to face the imminent Revolutionary War.

Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone Best Reviews

  • 'Vast and sweeping, this novel is a testament to Gabaldon's masterful storytelling, seamlessly weaving historical facts with rich, emotional narratives.' - The Washington Post
  • 'Gabaldon has once again delivered a compelling and immersive tale of love, war, and family in her latest Outlander novel.' - New York Times

Top Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone Quotes

  • 'The only refuge is what you can protect: your family, your friends, your home.'
  • 'It is a time for steel.'
  • 'Sometimes they questioned whether the perils of the 1700s were indeed the safer choice.'

Who should read Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone?

This book is ideal for fans of historical fiction, especially those who have followed the Outlander series. It appeals to readers who enjoy rich, character-driven narratives set against meticulously researched historical backdrops. Those interested in themes of family, loyalty, and resilience will find it particularly engaging.

About the Author

Diana Gabaldon is an American author best known for her Outlander series, which has been adapted into a successful television series. With a Ph.D. in quantitative behavioral ecology, Gabaldon is renowned for her detailed historical research and ability to intertwine factual history with compelling fiction. Her works have garnered critical acclaim and a dedicated readership worldwide.

Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone FAQs

What book follows 'Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone'?

The tenth major novel in the Outlander series, currently untitled, will follow 'Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone.'

What is the significance of the title 'Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone'?

The title refers to an old Celtic custom of informing bees about significant life events, ensuring they stay connected to the household.

What challenges do Brianna and Roger face in the story?

Brianna and Roger struggle with the dangers of 1779, questioning whether their escape from the 20th century was the right choice for their family's safety.